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Posts Tagged ‘Tommy Wieringa’

Caesarion shortlisted for IMPAC

In Awards on April 11, 2013 at 9:07 AM

Wieringa shortlisted for IMPAC
Caesarion by Tommy Wieringa is one of the ten books contending for the prestigious International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award 2013. Thanks to his shortlisted novel, Wieringa finds himself in the company of Michel Houellebecq (The Map and the Territory) and Haruki Murakami (1Q84).

The Impac Award is unusual because both novels written in English as well as novels translated into English are allowed to compete. The prize of €100,000, awarded annually, is divided between translator (€25,000) and author (€75,000) if a translation wins. The international jury, chaired by Eugene R. Sullivan, will announce the winner on Thursday 6th June.

About Caesarion
Ludwig Unter’s life held such promise. His parents were artists and, from an early age, his own musical genius had marked him out for a stellar career in the world’s concert halls. In his mother’s imagination, Ludwig is already on the way to surpassing her most ambitious dreams for him. But in reality, and for now, he’s playing in local cocktail bars and the two of them are living alone in a storm-lashed clifftop cottage in East Anglia. As the forceful winter seas bash away at the coastline, and Ludwig plunks away at the piano, he begins to tell a woman his story: a story of beauty and decay, of a child’s faith and parental betrayal, and of the importance, in the end, of self-sacrifice.

Caesarion was translated by Sam Garrett and published by Portobello (UK) and Grove (USA, under the title Little Caesar).

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Nominees 2013 International IMPAC DUBLIN Literary Award

In Awards on November 12, 2012 at 1:00 PM

The Book of Doubt - Tesa de Loo

154 books have been nominated by libraries worldwide for the €100,000 International IMPAC DUBLIN Literary Award, the world’s most valuable annual literary prize for a single work of fiction published in English. Four Dutch authors are among 43 American, 22 British and 12 Canadian, 8 Irish novels as well as 42 books translated into English from 18 other languages:

The Book of Doubt by Tessa de Loo, translated by Brian Doyle (Haus Publishing, UK). Tessa de Loo’s novel The Twins has been translated into 25 languages. She is also the author of In Byron’s Footsteps.

Even though he is the son of a Dutch mother, Saeed has a Moroccan first name in memory of the virtuoso oud player his mother fell in love with twenty years ago. When she found out she was pregnant, he ran off and returned to Morocco. Saeed decides to look for his father, in the hope of finding a new identity in a new world.

Julia by Otto de Kat, translated by Ina Rilke (MacLehose Press, UK)

One summer’s afternoon in 1981, a factory owner, Christiaan Dudok, is found dead in his study having taken his own life. He has left no suicide note, but on his desk is a newspaper from 2 April 1942, reporting on the bombing of the north German town of Lübeck. The list of the dead includes the highlighted name of Julia Bender. As a young man finishing his studies in Lübeck in 1938, Christiaan is irresistibly drawn to Julia, a courageous German who has emphatically rejected the Nazi regime.

Otto de Kat lives and works as a publisher and novelist in Amsterdam. Man on the Move (MacLehose Press, 2009) was the winner of Holland’s Halewijn Literature Prize.

Caesarion (US title: Little Caesar) by Tommy Wieringa, translated by Sam Garrett, nominated edition Portobello Books Ltd., UK.

Caesarion is a novel that asks how anyone can ever know for sure how to be the right parent for their child, and how any child can know how to let themselves be parented. It is a beautiful, strong and brave novel. It confirms Tommy Wieringa as a storyteller of great range and real distinction.

Tommy Wieringa’s novel Joe Speedboat was awarded with the Holland’s Halewijn prize.

The Cocaine Salesman by Conny Braam, translated by Jonathan Reeder (nominated edition: Haus Publishing)

On 31st July 1917, 26-year-old Englishman Robin Ryder clambers from a trench on the Flanders battlefields and charges recklessly towards the German artillery. Later he is heavily wounded by a German grenade; despite extensive plastic surgery, half his face will have to be hidden behind a mask.

Conny Braam’s other books include Operatie Vula, De Bokkeslachter and Zwavel, a trilogy of novels about the Abraham family.

Publishers Weekly picks Little Caesar

In Pick of the Week on November 5, 2012 at 2:51 PM

Little Caesar Tommy Wieringa

Publishers Weekly picked Tommy Wieringa’s new novel Little Caesar as one of the Best New Books of this week:

As Wieringa’s second English-language novel (after Joe Speedboat) begins, down-and-out musician Ludwig Unger returns to coastal Kings Ness, England, where the houses are in constant danger of tumbling into the sea and the rabbits are all inexplicably diseased, making it immediately clear that we’re in surreal territory despite the lucidity of the narration and prose. From his perch at a hotel lounge piano where he performs schmaltzy standards, Ludwig tells his tale: upon discovering that his mother was actually Eve LeSage, “the Grace Kelley of porn,” Ludwig, then 21, traveled to L.A. to confront her, only to witness her Las Vegas comeback after two decades out of the spotlight. Longing for less radical expressions of love from his mother, Ludwig goes with her and her production company to Vienna and Prague. Eve’s all-consuming sexuality makes a liability of Ludwig at every turn, but it’s an unforeseen problem with her attempt at a career revival that propels Ludwig to flee to Panama, where he encounters the sinister father who abandoned the family. Although perfectly charming as picaresque, the tragedy of Unger’s plight registers just as strongly as its understated oddness.

Little Caesar is translated from the Dutch by Sam Garrett.

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